More Research on Cannabis Withdrawal

The author cites a meta-analysis conducted by another group that some 47% of frequent cannabis users, both recreational and medical, were experiencing withdrawal symptoms.

Seems to me this has been a neglected aspect of the discussion around cannabis legalization and decriminalization. Here's one example:

More than half of people using medical cannabis for pain experience withdrawal symptoms

It’s from Yahoo News, not one of my usual sources, but written by one of the principal researchers on a large study conducted at the U. of Michigan. The study focused on withdrawal symptoms among 527 chronic pain patients who were enrolled in medical marijuana programs. Among the findings: nearly 60% of subjects described moderate to severe withdrawal when they stopped or significantly cut back on cannabis consumption. Even for brief periods.

The most common symptoms were, predictably-- anxiety, irritability, and insomnia. Classic signs of physical dependence, and most likely a key factor in the patient's continuing reliance on cannabis. Subjects reported feeling better after taking cannabis, but worse after it wore off. No, the symptoms aren’t as...

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Drugstore Drama

...they’ll argue that since the doctors wrote the prescriptions, there’s no way the pharmacists could be expected to refuse them.

Other Paths to Legal Pot?

We certainly can’t count on the emerging cannabis industry to supply us with all the necessary facts, any more than we could count on the drug reps from Purdue Pharma to educate our physicians about the true risks of long-term opioid use in the treatment of chronic pain.

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Another Approach to Pain

Somehow, experts believe, the brain of the chronic pain patient has “learned” to interpret certain stimuli as a threat, accompanied by danger messages in the form of pain.

Another Approach to Pain

Somehow, experts believe, the brain of the chronic pain patient has “learned” to interpret certain stimuli as a threat, accompanied by danger messages in the form of pain.

Treatment & the Fellowships

Imagine a world where everyone with a chronic illness – be it heart disease, diabetes, lung disease, cancer, to name just a few-- had the advantage of a free, widely accessible, consistently available support network made up of former patients willing to sacrifice their own time and energy to reach out to those who still suffered.

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