Inexplicably Drunk

Of course, clinicians who work with offenders are accustomed to the occasional client who shows up stubbornly insisting that he or she had consumed no alcohol whatsoever before arrest.

True story:  A North Carolina man was pulled over for suspected drunk driving. Claiming he’d had nothing at all to drink, he refused the breath test and was taken to the local ER. There, his blood alcohol level was found to be .20, and he was charged with DWI.

Surprise: he was telling the truth. Not that the officer or the doctors could have known that at the time. It was another year before anyone understood. I learned about it in a Medscape update. Here's a helpful Wikipedia piece on what actually accounted for his elevated BAL.

Something called Auto Brewery Syndrome (ABS).

I’d heard of it, but never in the context of an actual arrest.

In this instance, a medical exam a full year later revealed the problem: two strains of yeast, commonly used in wine and beer making, were discovered in his stool. A subsequent test following a meal of carbohydrates showed that his body converted carbohydrates into enough alcohol to register on the blood test.

He was then put on...

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Inexplicably Drunk

Of course, clinicians who work with offenders are accustomed to the occasional client who shows up stubbornly insisting that he or she had consumed no alcohol whatsoever before arrest.

Inexplicably Drunk

Of course, clinicians who work with offenders are accustomed to the occasional client who shows up stubbornly insisting that he or she had consumed no alcohol whatsoever before arrest.

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